1. caries
  2. cavities
  3. E-cigarette smokers have an increased risk of developing cavities

E-cigarette smokers have an increased risk of developing cavities

 Electronic devices generate nicotine vapor.

E-cigarette smokers have an increased risk of developing cavities


A study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association has concluded that people who reported smoking electronic cigarettes had a significantly increased risk of developing caries. The study's authors, which involved more than 13,200 patients, are researchers from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in Boston and North Carolina at Chapel Hill University.

These devices generate nicotine-laced vapor, which can cause dry mouth, increased exposure to infections, bad breath, and/or sores, among other pathologies. In addition, the flavorings used may contain a large amount of sugar. In this regard, the ban on the sale, in the European Union, of flavored tobacco for electronic cigarettes came into force on November 23. Member States have eleven months to adopt this legislation.

One of the effects of nicotine and electronic cigarettes is gingival retraction, which causes sensitivity, inflammation, pain, or bleeding. In fact, the gums are the primary victims of this bad habit. Another effect that is being studied is the change in tooth color.
For this reason, we recommend following healthy habits and avoiding smoking both conventional tobacco and electronic cigarettes.

Comments